Author Archives: Pam Green

Memorial Day

Every year at the end of May, cemeteries get mowed and American flags get set on the graves of those who have served in our country’s military. Some towns have parades, many have ceremonies to commemorate soldiers with prayers and gun salutes, and families gather for cookouts. While all these activities are important ways to mark this day on the calendar, it’s also important to consider the individuals and the impact of service on their lives. Today I share three generations of men in the Kincaid family who proudly served our country.

John’s headstone

John Kincaid (1762/4-1840) was my 5th-great-grandfather. John enlisted in the Revolutionary War in 1779, serving as a private in Col. McCobb’s Regiment under Captains Hinkley and Lemont. A few years later, John married Susan Dracutt and started his family (9 children born between 1791 and 1815). John and his family lived in Pownalborough in 1790, Norridgewock in 1800, and Malta which is now known as Windsor in 1820 and 1830. In 1813, John enlisted in the U.S. Infantry, leaving his wife to run the home and care for the children. While on duty as a guard to a baggage wagon near Chatauqua Woods in New York, John sustained a serious injury to his left leg, a wound that never quite healed properly. John was discharged, received a pension, and is buried in the Riverside Cemetery in Augusta.

Guy Kincaid (1799-1860), the 5th child of John and Susan (Dracutt) Kincaid, was my 4th-great-grandfather. Guy enlisted in the Army Infantry in 1818, a few years before he married Sarah Creasey. Guy and Sarah had ten children between 1822 and 1845. They lived in Whitefield in 1830, Vassalboro in 1840, Augusta in 1850, and Wayne in 1860. Though Guy did not serve in conflict, nor do we know where he and his wife are buried, his service does not go unnoticed.

Hiram’s service medallion

Hiram Kincaid (1824-1877), the 2nd child of Guy and Sarah (Creasey) Kincaid, was my 3rd-great-grandfather. Hiram married Lovicia Cook in 1845 and supported his family (ten children born between 1848 and 1868) by working in local mills including a saw mill. The family lived in Mount Vernon in 1850, Wayne in 1860, and Livermore in 1870. In 1861, Hiram mustered for Civil War service in Company K, 3rd Infantry, 2nd Calvary. He was discharged from service in 1862 with a disability for which he received a pension. He was an invalid by 1865. Hiram is buried in the Richardson Cemetery in Livermore Falls with his wife Lovicia.

These three individuals were husbands, sons, and fathers – generations of service to others. While it’s important to remember the battles and to see fields of flags waving in the breeze, it also helps honor our soldiers to remember the stories about sacrifices made for their families and our country.

Posted in B's Blog

Stories Ahead

A new feature of MaineLife highlights some genealogy stories. Today seems as good as any to share the first family story.

On this day in history, John Coggeshall (_____-1647) was on a committee to lay out land in Portsmouth, Rhode Island. Who was this guy, you may ask? John was MaineLife’s 10th-great-grandfather who came from England to Massachusetts in 1632 on the “Lyon” with his wife Mary and three children. Can you even imagine crossing the ocean with a young family in those days? Definitely not a Carnival Cruise!

This picture came from Robert Darrell on ancestry.com. Though not very clear, the portrait and frame suggest that John was a man of some importance, not surprising given his positions in local government wherever he lived.

John was a textile merchant, and the family first settled in Roxbury before moving into Boston where John served as a selectman, an auditor, an assessor, court deputy, and on a surveying committee – a pretty active member of the community. Oh, John also supported public education.

In 1637 or 1638, the Boston General Court banished John and others for their support of Anne Hutchinson who believed in preaching good deeds rather than being saved by grace alone. Hutchinson and her supporters established the settlement of Portsmouth, Rhode Island.

In 1638, John moved his family to Portsmouth, Rhode Island where he continued his civic involvement and good deeds. It was on May 20, 1638.that he is known to have served on the land surveying committee. John also served as treasurer, auditor, moderator, a church elder, and the governor’s assistant.

Descendants of John and his wife read like this: their daughter Anne Coggeshall > Waite Easton > Patience Carr > Edward Estes > Silas Estes > Prudence Estes > Jackson Davis > Ernest Davis > Lillian Davis. Lillian was MaineLife’s great-grandmother.

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